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Arianna Clark

One of six kids, Arianna Clark ’16 felt incredibly fortunate when the Elizabeth G. Wolcott Scholarship made it possible for her to attend Syracuse University. After meeting Dean Wolcott, the man who, together with his late wife, created the scholarship, she felt not only lucky, but inspired by their generosity. Now she pushes herself “to the limit and beyond in all that I do, to prove that their gift is making a difference.”

Where I’m from…

I’m from Albany, New York, and am currently a political science major.

What I do besides study…

I love to read and watch movies on Netflix. And I’m always up for volunteer work, especially working with animals. I’m a big animal lover. I have two dogs and a cat whom I consider to be my extended siblings.

Why I chose Syracuse University…

I chose Syracuse because the day I visited, I immediately felt at home. It wasn’t a feeling I had at any of the other schools I visited, so I knew that I had found the perfect school.

What I love most about it…

I love the atmosphere. There’s so much diversity on campus, yet everyone here is one big community. It’s amazing to see everyone come together for events on campus. There’s a sense of pride that comes with wearing Orange. On freshmen move-in day last year I felt that sense of pride for the first time and, as countless alums have told me, I will bleed Orange for the rest of my life.

What do I plan to do with my degree…

I plan on going to law school and eventually practicing law.

What the Elizabeth G. Wolcott Scholarship means to me…

It’s opened up a world of options and opportunities, and gives me the ability to achieve the goals I’ve set for myself. Without it, going to Syracuse University would have been difficult, if not impossible. With it, I’m able to attend a school that challenges me, inspires me, and brings me happiness.

How my scholarship donor inspired me…

Recently, I had the opportunity to meet my scholarship donor. He was extremely kind and has had an interesting, successful life, starting with his Syracuse University schooling. His and his late wife’s generosity has inspired me to push myself to the limit and beyond in my schooling, ambitions, and interests. I strive to be the best in all that I do to prove to them that their gifts are truly making a difference in my life.

What I would say to someone who is thinking about giving…

Giving to Syracuse University can change an individual’s life and inspire them to pursue their dreams and achieve something great. Attending school here and being given the opportunity to pursue my dreams, interests, and passions is one of the greatest gifts I could ever receive.

Dean ’50 and Betty Berger Wolcott ’51:
Honoring a Daughter’s Memory

Dean Wolcott ’50 and his late wife, Betty Berger Wolcott ’51, became active in alumni affairs in the early 1950s and have given to Syracuse University on a regular basis.

“At first our gifts were miniscule,” says Wolcott, who now lives on a cattle ranch in Mancos, Colorado. But over the years, the Wolcotts’ generosity grew. They then established an endowed dean’s scholarship fund that supports four dean’s scholars simultaneously in the College of Arts and Sciences.

“Betty got through school with scholarship support and by waiting tables,” says Wolcott, who enjoyed a 34-year career with Aetna Life & Casualty Company. “That motivated us to give to Syracuse University. We want to help other young people pursue a college education.”

One of their four children, Elizabeth, graduated from SU’s School of Nursing in 1977. Following her death in 1999, the Wolcotts honored her memory by creating the Elizabeth G. Wolcott Dean’s Scholarship for nursing students. Since the closing of the nursing school, the scholarship has supported students in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. “We are great believers in SU,” Wolcott says. “Establishing a scholarship in Elizabeth’s name was important to us.”

The Wolcotts have also established two more endowed dean’s scholarship funds in their names—one in the Martin J. Whitman School of Management and the other in Falk College. “It is our way of saying thank you,” Wolcott says.